Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Henry Morris’

The Power of Love

Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I have become sounding brass or a clanging cymbal. And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. And though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, but have not love, it profits me nothing. (1 Corinthians 13:1-3)

The term “love” brings up all sorts of ideas in our widely mixed Western world. The media tend to picture love with desire and feelings and most often promote an equation of love with lovemaking—especially when love is the result of chemistry that bursts into passionate magic. Most of today’s thriving online matchmaking services market their brand of “happily ever after” using personality tests or compatibility pairing—and all of them brag about their success rates.

Speed-dating services and companies like It’s Just Lunch—along with Zoosk, OurTime, ChristianMingle, SingleParentMeet.com, and a host of others—promise to find love for you with “that special someone.” eHarmony alone has more than 15 million members and Match.com has more than 21 million.1 One reliable source estimates that the dating industry brings in over one billion dollars in revenue each year in the U.S. alone, and the average client spends well over two hundred dollars per year to find the “right person.”1

Reasonable, you might say, if real love is found.

It is interesting to note, however, that although the Bible does validate physical lovemaking in marriage as the purpose and design of the Creator, the concept of recreational sex outside of marriage is never promoted in Scripture—all promiscuous, premarital, and extramarital sex is strictly forbidden. Biblical love is based on a much different premise.

Perhaps the easiest way to understand the focus that God requires in a love relationship (both in marriage and in friendship) is to note the play on words in the interaction between the Lord Jesus and Peter after the resurrection. The apostles met with the Lord on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, and Jesus asked Peter if he “loved” Him. Jesus used the word agapao.2 Peter responded with phileo. The interchange in John 21:15- 17 runs like this:

Jesus: “Do you LOVE Me?”
Peter: “Yes, Lord, You know I LIKE You.”
Jesus: “Feed My lambs.”

Jesus: “Do you LOVE Me?”
Peter: “Yes, Lord, You know I LIKE You.”
Jesus: “Tend My sheep.”

Jesus: “Do you LIKE Me?”
Peter: “You know that I LIKE You!”
Jesus: “Feed My sheep.”

These two words are at the heart of the human problem. God’s love—the love that God exercised when He “gave His only begotten Son”—was agape love.3 That kind of love is unilateral. That kind of love is a promise from the giver to the receiver with a mental commitment to continue that love without regard to circumstances, feelings, or reciprocation. When reciprocated, agape love produces a bond that is almost impossible to break. Yes, the human heart is fallible and sometimes breaks a relationship established on biblical love. But God’s love never fails. Many may reject His love, but God’s love was extended to all humanity with the request that they believe that He loved them.

Human love, on the other hand, in its normal form is phileo love—love that is based on mutual fondness. Hence, the emphasis of the modern dating services on compatibility. And it works…for a while. If folks like each other and enjoy the same sort of behavior, they can get along together under normal circumstances. But when any kind of crisis erupts, disability occurs, or serious differences of opinions develop (and they will), the “like” shows its weakness because it is not “love.” The relationship suffers and may ultimately dissolve.

The Bible speaks of the two pillars of the Law upon which the relationships of man with God and man with man rest. The first pillar is called the Greatest Commandment: “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind” (Matthew 22:37). This pillar, of course, summarizes the first four of the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:2-11).

  • God is to reign—nothing is superior.

  • God is not reproducible—there is no other likeness.

  • God is to be reverenced—He is not “ordinary.”

  • God is to be remembered—He is the Creator!

The second pillar is: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself ” (Matthew 22:39). The neighbor has a broad application according to the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:29-37). That second pillar is summarized by the last six of the Ten Commandments.

Coupled with the obvious emphasis on the agape love outlined in the Ten Commandments, the Bible speaks of a two-master problem. You cannot love two opposing ideas (people, lifestyles, worldviews, etc.); one or the other will dominate your heart (1 Timothy 6:9-10; Matthew 6:23). Put simply, relationships with God and with other humans will either be based on a mutual fondness (phileo) or an intellectual, unilateral commitment (agape).

Perhaps the greatest test of whether love or fondness dominates our lives is examining our practice to see if we do not love what God does not love. And that boils down to how we relate to the “world” (1 John 2:15-17)—the system that places self and monetary success or personal dominance over submission to the authority of the Creator.

On the positive side, “love does no harm to a neighbor; therefore love is the fulfillment of the law” (Romans 13:10). This kind of human love is really an expression of God’s love. That love is easy to define, even if difficult to keep, and is found in the classic passage in 1 Corinthians 13:4-7. God’s love is summed up by the following qualities:

Individuals seeking God’s character and instructions for a successful life (i.e., successful in God’s eyes) find their focus in a love for the Word of God (John 14:15-24; 1 John 5:2-3). Our secular world is struggling to find love and falling prey to relationships based only on a mutual fondness that fades with time and circumstance.

In stark contrast, God’s love stimulates good works (Hebrews 10:24). It causes us to honor our leaders (1 Thessalonians 5:12-13). God’s love produces confidence and even fearlessness (2 Timothy 1:7; 1 John 4:18) and a growing maturity in our ability to understand and cope with life (Ephesians 4:15; Colossians 2:2). And God’s love enables us to love others as He has loved us (John 13:34).

Ultimately, of course, God’s love—made efficacious in us through His salvation—provides confidence in His sovereign control (Romans 8:28) and security in His faithful preservation (Romans 8:35-39). When God gives instructions for husbands to love their wives, He uses agapao rather than phileo (Ephesians 5:25). That kind of love continues “for better or for worse” and does not waver when circumstances change. Agape love commits for life; phileo love falls away when the passion fades. It allows only surface sacrifice and protects self rather than the other. But God grants the twice-born special ability to demonstrate the powerful agape love that unreservedly sacrifices for the sake of the one loved. “Greater love [agapen] has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends” (John 15:13).

References

  1. Online Dating Statistics. Statistic Brain. Posted on statisticbrain.com January 1, 2014, accessed January 7, 2014.

  2. Agapao is the verb form, and agape is the noun.

  3. John 3:16.

* Dr. Morris is Chief Executive Officer of the Institute for Creation Research.

Cite this article: Henry Morris III, D.Min. 2014. The Power of Love. Acts & Facts. 43 (2).

1417535_678428142219265_742015436_o

Read Full Post »

149492_485433574862380_1187915940_n

Sweet Naamah
“Behold, thou art fair, my beloved, yea, pleasant: also our bed is green.” (Song of Solomon 1:16)17823_486585701413834_1517720336_n

 

These words begin King Solomon’s tender expressions of love to his beautiful young wife. Solomon wrote a thousand and five songs (1 Kings 4:32), but apparently this was his favorite, for he called it his “song of songs” (Song 1:1), and it clearly centered on his beloved, whom he called “my sister, my spouse” no less than four times (Song 4:9-12; 5:1), thereby intimating both their spiritual and marital relationship.

 Rehoboam was Solomon’s only son, as far as recorded, and his mother’s name was Naamah (2 Chronicles 12:13), meaning “pleasant.” Since he was 41 years old when he inherited Solomon’s throne and since Solomon had only reigned 40 years (2 Chronicles 9:30), the marriage of Solomon and Naamah must have been formalized when Solomon was quite young, long before he was married to Pharoah’s daughter or any of his other 700 wives. Naamah was then and always his one real love, in spite of his spiritual defections in old age. His counsel to young men near the end of his life was: “Live joyfully with the wife whom thou lovest all the days . . . of thy vanity” (Ecclesiastes 9:9).
 Note that Solomon called her “fair” and “beloved” in our text, and then “pleasant.” The Hebrew word for “pleasant” is very similar to “Naamah,” as though Solomon were calling her by a shortened form of her name as a term of endearment. The same word is occasionally translated “sweet.” Naamah was surely a sweet, pleasant maiden, but also a capable woman in mind and heart, fit to become a queen.
 Solomon’s song for and about her is an inspired ode to true marital love and thus can even be a figurative testimony to the love of Christ, the “greater than Solomon,” for His church. HMM

http://www.icr.org/articles/type/6/

485821_508075135931557_790788173_n

Read Full Post »

    

The Design and Complexity of the Cell

by Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D.

The majority of scientifically trained biologists and geneticists are taught that the apparent design that is observed in cells is the result of only random chemical and energy processes operating over eons of time. Such a belief system prompts their thinking to rest on purely natural logic, producing materialistic conclusions—and often ignoring or marginalizing the implications of careful engineering and design.

There are, however, multiple thousands of scientists who accept the Bible’s message that there is a Creator who planned the creation, designed the intricate engineering efficiencies into that creation, and then built the product: our planet and its wonderfully unique life and functions. That belief system not only fits empirically with what is observed (design, precise function, operational efficiencies, etc.), but provides insight that enables creation-based scientists to grasp the significance of the information more readily—without having to invent a supposed eons-long story for the development of what is actually observed.

Dr. Jeffrey Tomkins and his contributing colleagues have provided an excellent resource that documents and helps explain the intricate processes of cells, and gives keen insight for “clearly seeing” the obvious hand of the Creator in the “things that are made” (Romans 1:20).


Click here for more information about Dr. Jeffrey Tomkins and contributing authors.

Primary Author

Dr. Jeffrey Tomkins

Research Associate

Dr. Jeffrey Tomkins earned a master’s degree in Plant Science in 1990 from the University of Idaho, where he performed research in plant hormones. He received his Ph.D. in Genetics from Clemson University in 1996. While at Clemson, he worked as a research technician in a plant breeding/genetics program, with a research focus in the area of quantitative and physiological genetics in soybean. After receiving his Ph.D., he worked at a genomics institute and became a faculty member in the Department of Genetics and Biochemistry at Clemson. He had become a Christian as an undergraduate at Washington State University in 1982, with a goal to eventually work as a scientist and author in the creation science field. In 2009, Dr. Tomkins joined the Institute for Creation Research as Research Associate. He is the primary author of The Design and Complexity of the Cell.


 Contributing Authors

Dr. Nathaniel Jeanson

Deputy Director for Life Sciences

 Contribution:

  • Chapter 9: The Biology of Stem Cells

  • Chapter 10: Processes and Implications of Stem Cell Research

For more information about Dr. Jeanson, click here.


Dr. Brad Forlow

 Contribution:

  • Appendix 2: The Development of Pharmaceutical Therapeutics

Dr. Randy Guliuzza

National Representative

 Contribution:

  • Life’s Indispensable Microscopic Machines

  • Life-Giving Blood

  • Human Reproduction

  • Immune Systems, The Body’s Security Force

  • Darwinian Medicine: A Prescription for Failure

For more information about Dr. Guliuzza, click here.


Brian Thomas

Science Writer

 Contribution:

  • Have Scientists Created a Synthetic Cell?

  • Where Did Flesh-eating Bacteria Come From?

  • Brain’s Complexity “Is Beyond Anything Imagined”

  • The Mysteries of Stunning Soft Tissue Fossil Finds

For more information about Mr. Thomas, click here.


Frank Sherwin

Research Associate, Senior Lecturer, and Science Writer

 Contribution:

  • Cells: Sophisticated and God-Designed

For more information about Mr. Sherwin, click here.

Click here to read the Foreword by Dr. Henry Morris III.

Foreword

The functions within the cells of our bodies are foundational to our existence. Understanding these functions has made the environment and the processes of our lifestyles healthier, more enjoyable, and more productive. All of humanity has benefited from the life sciences and the scientists who have dedicated their considerable skills to uncovering the functions and processes of the multifaceted variety of cells.

Although scientists have discovered, documented, and developed wonderful insights about the complex information, precise sequential processes, and unique interwoven controls within cells, there is a huge chasm among scientists when they try to understand how these highly efficient processes got started in the first place.

The majority of scientifically trained biologists and geneticists are taught that the apparent design that is observed in cells is the result of only random chemical and energy processes operating over eons of time. Such a belief system prompts their thinking to rest on purely natural logic, producing materialistic conclusions— and often ignoring or marginalizing the implications of careful engineering and design.

There are, however, multiple thousands of scientists who accept the Bible’s message that there is a Creator who planned the creation, designed the intricate engineering efficiencies into that creation, and then built the product: our planet and its wonderfully unique life and functions. That belief system not only fits empirically with what is observed (design, precise function, operational efficiencies, etc.), but provides insight that enables creation-based scientists to grasp the significance of the information more readily—without having to invent a supposed eons-long story for the development of what is actually observed. Dr. Jeffrey Tomkins and his contributing colleagues have provided an excellent resource that will document and help explain the intricate processes of cells and give some keen insight for “clearly seeing” the obvious hand of the Creator in the “things that are made” (Romans 1:20).

Each chapter is written for technical accuracy. Most high school biology students will find the information similar to what is in their textbooks—but more carefully explained regarding the clear presence of design. Interspersed throughout the book are short articles that will provide specific examples of the cellular functions as they impact system operation. These examples will provide observable applications of how these marvelous processes insure that the purpose of each design is fulfilled.

At the end of each chapter is an information summary that will reinforce the science discussed and outline the design characteristics easily identified by the discoveries.

This book is designed as a scientific resource and ready reference, as well as an apologetic tool to use as a witness of the omnipotent and omniscient Creator and Savior. Our prayer at the Institute for Creation Research is that you will find both of these purposes fulfilled in your life.

Henry M. Morris III
Chief Executive Officer
Institute for Creation Research

Click here to see the Table of Contents.

Table of Contents

Page
Contributors 7
Foreword 9
Introduction 10
Chapter 1 Dogma and Science Surrounding Cell Origins 13
Abiogenesis 13
The Evolutionary Problem of the Cell 17
Have Scientists Created Artificial Life? 18
Summary 19
Application: Have Scientists Created a Synthetic Cell? 20
Chapter 2 A Basic Description of Cells and Cell Types 23
A Basic Definition of Cells 23
Two Basic Cell Types in Biology 25
Prokaryotic Cell Characteristics 27
Development of a Model System for Cell Biology 30
E. coli: The Prokaryotic Model for Evolution 30
The Role of Cells in Biological Creation 31
Summary 33
Application: Life’s Indispensable Microscopic Machines 34
Chapter 3 Eukaryotic Cells and Multicellularity 37
The Highly Engineered Eukaryotic Nucleus and Mitochondria 38
Mitochondria: The Evolutionary Model of Symbiosis Is Unsupported 40
Plant Cell Chloroplasts 41
Additional Eukaryotic Cell Characteristics 42
Summary 45
Application: Life-Giving Blood 46
Chapter 4 Genes and Proteins 49
DNA: The Cell’s Genetic Blueprint 49
Making a Protein 50
A Masterpiece of Design and Purpose 53
Summary 54
Application: Where Did Flesh-Eating Bacteria Come From? 55
Chapter 5 Cell Division and DNA Replication: How Life Is Engineered to Perpetuate 57
Cell Division: The Basic Biological Process Required for Life 57
Mitosis 59
Meiosis 60
Summary 64
Application: Brain’s Complexity “Is Beyond Anything Imagined” 65
Chapter 6 Cell Signaling: The Miracle of the Biological Network 67
Cell Surface Receptors 67
Neurons 69
Summary 71
Application: Human Reproduction 72
Chapter 7 The Cytoskeleton and the Extracellular Matrix: How Biology Achieves Shape, Form, and Movement 75
Actin Filaments and Microtubules 75
Junctions between Cells 77
The Extracellular Matrix 79
Summary 80
Application: The Mysteries of Stunning Soft Tissue Fossil Finds 81
Chapter 8 Cells in Creation, Sin, and Redemption 83
Plants 83
Photosynthesis and Respiration 84
Water, Air, and Land Creatures 85
Consequences of the Curse 86
Summary 87
Application: Immune Systems, the Body’s Security Force 88
Chapter 9 The Biology of Stem Cells 91
The Biology of Adult Stem Cells 91
Cellular Mechanisms of Self-Renewal and Differentiation 93
Molecular Mechanisms of Self-Renewal and Differentiation 94
The Biology of Embryonic Stem Cells 95
How Embryonic Stem Cells Work: Mechanisms of ESC Self-Renewal and Differentiation 95
The Origins of Human Cellular Diversity: The Fact of Creation and the Insufficiency of Evolution 96
Summary 97
Application: Darwinian Medicine: A Prescription for Failure 98
Chapter 10 Processes and Implications of Stem Cell Research 101
Reprogramming and Cloning 103
Stem Cells and Medicine: Cell Therapy 105
Stem Cell Ethics 106
Conclusion 109
Summary 110
Application: Cells: Sophisticated and God-Designed 111
Appendix 1 Biology and the Bible 113
Appendix 2

 

117
Therapeutic Intervention 117
Pharmaceutical Drug Discovery and Development 118
Pharmacological Inhibition 123
Conclusion 124
Glossary 125
Credits 128
Index 129

This beautiful, full-color book in hardcover is only $19.99 (plus shipping and handling). Click here to order your copy today!

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: